AAAS Statement on White House Executive Order on Cuba Relations

AAAS Statement on White House Executive Order on Cuba Relations

We are concerned about President Trump’s announcement that he will walk back relations between the United States and Cuba, and the potential negative impact on cooperation between scientists in our twocountries. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) remains committed to engaging in the exchange of scientists and scientific knowledge between the U.S. and Cuba.

Being a Force for the Science Budget

Being a Force for the Science Budget

After President Trump released a proposed FY 2018 budget on May 23 that would severely cut funding for scientific research, our members have been busy contacting their representatives. Through AAAS’s advocacy platform, more than 550 members sent 1,687 letters to 330 congressional offices expressing a range of views on how the budget request would impact research.

EPA Seeks Nominations to Serve on Science Board

EPA Seeks Nominations to Serve on Science Board

The Environmental Protection Agency announced that it is seeking nominations of technical experts to serve on the Board of Scientific Counselor’s (BOSC), a federal advisory committee to EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Speak up for reliable and valid forensic science

Speak up for reliable and valid forensic science

On April 10, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opted not to renew the NCFS, and the Department of Justice (DOJ) issued a Notice of Public Comment Period on Advancing Forensic Science requesting input on how they should “move forward to strengthen the foundations of forensic science and improve the operations and capacity of forensic laboratories.”

We encourage you to make your voice heard on the importance of ensuring that all branches of government receive advice on the best scientific information available, and that rigorous science is used in convicting the guilty and exonerating the innocent. Comments are due June 9, 2017.

FY 2018 R&D Appropriations Dashboard

FY 2018 R&D Appropriations Dashboard

The linked dashboard can be used to follow science and technology appropriations for FY 2018. Click on individual tabs to see how different agencies are faring throughout the funding debate, and mouse over for more detail. Currently, only data from the Trump Administration's budget request is displayed; data from Congressional spending bills will be added and updated once Congress begins to take up spending legislation this summer.

Visit regularly for updated content.

Just 90 companies are to blame for most climate change, this 'carbon accountant' says

Just 90 companies are to blame for most climate change, this 'carbon accountant' says

From August 25, 2016

Last month, geographer Richard Heede received a subpoena from Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), chairman of the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Smith, a climate change doubter, became concerned when the attorneys general of several states launched investigations into whether ExxonMobil had committed fraud by sowing doubts about climate change even as its own scientists knew it was taking place. The congressman suspected a conspiracy between the attorneys general and environmental advocates, and he wanted to see all the communications among them. Predictably, his targets included advocacy organizations such as Greenpeace, 350.org, and the Union of Concerned Scientists. They also included Heede, who works on his own aboard a rented houseboat on San Francisco Bay in California.

Trump dumps Paris climate deal: reaction

Trump dumps Paris climate deal: reaction

As expected, President Donald Trump today announced he is withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate accord. In a speech from the White House Rose Garden, Trump made a largely economic case for withdrawing from the agreement, arguing the nonbinding accord was unfair to American workers and U.S. competitiveness (points many economists fiercely dispute). At the same time, Trump said he was open to beginning “negotiations to reenter either the Paris accord or an—really entirely new transaction—on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers.” He provided no detail, however, on what that new agreement might look like.

Exiting Paris Accord Would Cede U.S. Scientific Leadership Role, Says AAAS CEO

Exiting Paris Accord Would Cede U.S. Scientific Leadership Role, Says AAAS CEO

President Donald Trump’s expected decision to pull the United States away from the Paris Agreement would put future generations at risk and leave the nation without a plan to mitigate the impact of climate change on society, said Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, on June 1.

Can eco-leadership save the planet?

Can eco-leadership save the planet?

Earth does not have environmental problems—rather, psychologists argue that the environmental crises we currently face are the result of unsustainable human behavior. This paper reviews psychology research about why our responses to environmental crises have been inadequate. Why might some people believe climate change is real while others do not? The article discusses why understanding ecology is critical and notes specific types of behaviors that can inspire the change that is needed to create a livable planet. The review ends with a description of conservation psychology topics that need further research.

Digesting The White House’s ‘Devastating’ Cuts To Science Funding

Digesting The White House’s ‘Devastating’ Cuts To Science Funding

The White House’s final proposal for the 2018 budget is in, and the numbers have some scientists worried. If Congress passes the budget as it’s written, the National Institutes of Health would lose $7.7 billion, or 22 percent of its entire budget. The Department of Energy’s Office of Science would lose 17 percent of its funding for research into nuclear physics, environmental and biological science, and other programs. And the Department of Agriculture, which funds agricultural research, would lose up to 11 percent of a budget that is already far too small, according to Rush Holt, the CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

All the ways Trump’s budget targets climate scientists

President Donald Trump may be 6,000 miles away from Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, but that didn't stop him from launching an all-out assault on climate science and related energy research. The weapon of choice? His fiscal year 2018 budget proposal.

White House Budget Aims to Kill ‘Crazy’ Climate Science

As The White House released its budget request for the 2018 fiscal year on Tuesday, the Trump administration made good on its promise to target deep cuts to federal spending on climate, energy, science, research and other programs widely seen as critical to America’s ability to adapt to a warming world and reduce its impact on the climate.